• Jon Ruwolt

Quality Federation Renovations

Updated: Aug 12, 2019


CLASSIC beauty should be more than skin deep for grand Federation style houses.


With its tall chimneys and heritage features, this former doctor’s surgery in Griffith ACT is a rare offering

There are several common ways of renovating a Federation home:


236 La Trobe Tce, Geelong West

The detailed ceilings in the loungeroom draw the eye up at 236 La Trobe Tce, Geelong West
  1. The same materials: Builders and other tradespersons use the same materials to restore structural work, basically faithfully reproducing the original construction where needed and refurbishing existing components wherever possible.

Modern paints and other finishing products are acceptable, but must be faithful to the original.

Recycled materials are used wherever possible. This is an especially effective way to make a home extension blend in with the original house

  1. Modern materials manufactured and/or rendered to look like Federation era materials are used to restore and improve badly damaged Federation homes or homes that were built from fibrous cement. Brick and stone veneers are examples of this.


  1. A post modern approach to renovating Federation homes includes stylistic elements of the era and ultra-modern features that are in keeping with the original spirit of these homes.


Rear extension at 236 La Trobe Tce, Geelong West

For example, double-glazed floor to ceiling windows and sliding doors may be used at the back of the home to open it up to the garden. The garden may include native flora, a spacious lawn, a gazebo, a spa, a swimming pool or a combination of features.

  1. For the ultimate Federation home restoration, get an architect or interior designer with a background in the style to help you. Together, you can create a home that reflects your modern lifestyle and at the same time honours our rich Australian heritage.

Heritage Issues

While it may seem that heritage controls exist to preserve a building exactly as it originally stood, the Victorian Department of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure notes that

“not every building or landscape element will be significant”, and that making changes or removing “non-contributory” elements of heritage places is generally not an issue.